Monday, March 10, 2008

Go Green, America

Consider the ramifications of a pro-choice mentality that begins with the assumption that everything is disposable; the arrogance that consistently asserts individual rights of the greater over the lesser. Might makes right, and so your continued existence hinges largely upon the extent to which you inconvenience me.

Now, if I apply these principles to the natural world, as has been done in generations past, the outcome may well result in the extinction of certain unsavory species which are not immediately advantageous to human survival. Trees, insects, animals... no natural resource is safe once it becomes a valuable commodity or an irritating inconvenience.

But all that's changing, as modern man has begun to appreciate the delicate balance that holds ecosystems intact. We recognize the potentially devastating effect which the destruction of one seemingly insignificant rodent population can have on an entire food chain. And so we conserve. We think long-term thoughts, carefully weighing today's decisions against tomorrow's outcome.

In short, we are practicing delayed gratification, recognizing that the quick fix is rarely without tremendous cost, and acknowledging the value of an investment in the future. We're willing to trade today's good for tomorrow's best, and so we advance as a species, growing in wisdom and strength.

There's one area, however, where shameless consumerism and a mentality of "disposability" is encouraged and even lauded. Ironically, it's the most precious natural resource of all, though one would be hard pressed to find supporting evidence of this in most developed countries.

It's human life. (And before every green hippie who accidentally stumbled upon this sight clicks away in disgust, hear me out.) All that we hold to be good in the natural environment, in creation, takes its goodness from an ultimate good. If not God, than something else, necessarily, must take His place. To be considered good, something must exist in relation to something else, taking its goodness from an objective standard by which said goodness is measured.

I argue that for the godless, humanity is this universal good. Few would be willing to admit differently, and even the most ardently pro-choice environmentalist values his own life over any principle or ideal he might champion publicly.

Abortion is the ultimate proof of this mentality of entitled consumerism that we do so well in America, reducing the human person to a disposable commodity which can be mass produced and discarded at will. If we can demand that the natural world bow down before us and service our needs, why should we not expect similar behavior from our fellow man?

2 comments:

  1. "I argue that for the godless, humanity is this universal good. Few would be willing to admit differently, and even the most ardently pro-choice environmentalist values his own life over any principle or ideal he might champion publicly."

    Interesting. What evidence can you provide to support these assertions?

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  2. The only evidence I can offer is the seeming unwillingness of a pro-choicer to offer his own life as a means of curbing population growth and in an attempt to ultimately eradicate his own carbon footprint.

    It's easy enough to be pro-choice when someone else's life is in question, but I've yet to see this conviction carried out to its logical conclusion, suicide.

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